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FACULTY OF PHILOSOPHY - ENGLISH DEPARTMENT
BYRON AND GREECE
ENGLISH LITERATURE TERM PAPER
Andrejević Ana
CONTENTS
BIOGRAPHY..............................................................................................3
GREECE VISITED FOR THE FIRST TIME…………………………………………………………………7
GRECIAN POEMS……………………………………………………………………………………………………10
REBEL WITH A CAUSE………………………………………………………………………………………….12
BIBLIOGRAPHY………………………………………………………………………………………………………16
BIOGRAPHY
The isles of Greece, the isles of Greece!
Where burning Sappho loved and sung,
Where grew the arts of war and peace,
Where Delos rose, and Phoebus
sprung!
Eternal summer gilds them yet,
But all, except their sun, is set...
"He gave the people of his best:
His worst he kept, his best he gave."
Byron paid two visits to Greece during his short existence of thirty-six years. The first was his journey as a young man, when in 1809, at the age of twenty-one, he left the perilous delights of town to start on his "Grand Tour." This was Byron's "travel-year." In taking it, he was acting after the general habit and fashion of the order to which he belonged. The high-born of England in those days surveyed the earth before they proceeded to rule over their. Byron was an English Peer of the Realm: he had been so ever since his tenth year. It was usual for young English
...............................NAMERNO UKLONJEN DEO TEKSTA.................................
cratic indulgence. Some allowance had to be made for literary leanings, rare in a Peer, and notoriously dangerous to morals. But as yet there was no inexpiable mark against him in the records of English Society. He had sown his wild oats like any other young English aristo crat--perhaps a little more plentifully than most, a little more scandalously, and with just that touch of defiance and insolence which was to characterise all his proceedings. Rumours of Newstead Abbey had unpleasantly recalled Medmenham Abbey and John Wilkes.
But much must be allowed to youth. English society of that day was by no means strait-laced: it was the day of the Prince Regent. Men shrugged their shoulders,and women stared. It was good that this young Peer should go abroad. He would come back cured of his wildoats, and perhaps also of his wild poems. So he was allowed to travel along the golden chain of the elect with which England then girded the Mediterranean. It was a year of pause ( 1809) in the great strife with Napoleon. The Corsican had conquered Europe; but England still held the sea. Travel was not without risks; the future was uncertain. Byron had to confine his visits to friendly countries. He chose to land first at Lisbon, in friendly Portugal. That great British counter-thrust, the Peninsular War, was already in its first beginnings; and an English visitor was popular in Portugal and Southern Spain. So Byron rode--four hundred miles--along the Peninsula from Lisbon to Cadiz. Then he was convoyed by English "men-of-war" along the Mediterranean by way of Gibraltar and Malta to Prevesa in Albania, on the eastern coast of the Adriatic.
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